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Electroencephalogram

An Electroencephalogram (EEG) is a test that detects abnormalities in your brain waves, or in the electrical activity of your brain. During the procedure, electrodes consisting of small metal discs with thin wires are pasted onto your scalp. The electrodes detect tiny electrical charges that result from the activity of your brain cells. The charges are amplified and appear as a graph on a computer screen, or as a recording that may be printed out on paper. EEG is most often used to diagnose epilepsy, which causes abnormalities in EEG readings (Tatum & William, 2014). It is also used to diagnose sleep disorders, depth of anesthesia, coma, encephalopathies, and brain death. EEG used to be a first-line method of diagnosis for tumors, stroke and other focal brain disorders (Chernecky et al., 2013). Derivatives of the EEG technique include evoked potentials (EP), which involves averaging the EEG activity time-locked to the presentation of a stimulus of some sort (visual, somatosensory, or auditory). Event-related potentials (ERPs) refer to averaged EEG responses that are time-locked to more complex processing of stimuli; this technique is used in cognitive science, cognitive psychology, and psychophysiological research (Luck & Steven, 2005).

References

Chernecky, Cynthia C.; Berger, Barbara J. (2013). Laboratory tests and diagnostic procedures (6th ed.). St. Louis, Mo.: Elsevier. ISBN 9781455706945.

Luck, Steven J. (2005). An Introduction to the Event-Related Potential Technique. The MIT Press. ISBN 0-262-12277-4.

Tatum, William O. (2014). Handbook of EEG interpretation. Demos Medical Publishing. pp. 155–190. ISBN 9781617051807. OCLC 874563370.

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